Fort Sumter and Fort Moultrie National Historical Park | BATTERY HUGER

Battery Huger at Fort Sumter and Fort Moultrie National Historical Park

Battery Huger at Fort Sumter and Fort Moultrie National Historical Park

Battery Huger is the concrete structure located in the middle of Fort Sumter. Spurred on by the start of the Spanish-American War, construction began in 1898 and finished in 1899. Two guns were originally installed at the battery, both long range 12” M1888MIIs (8-9 mile range), one of which was mounted on a disappearing carriage. The Spanish-American War started in April of 1898 and only lasted ten weeks, so Huger never saw any action and its guns were never fired during war time.

During World War I, the battery was manned by a small group of soldiers, but after the war it (and Fort Sumter) became a tourist attraction. It wasn’t until the start of World War II that the fort again became an active military installation.

Coastal forts became obsolete by the end of World War II due to technology and modern military tactics. In the past, an invading army could only reach its designation by sea and come ashore at hospitable locations. Once airplanes and amphibious landing crafts became a standard part of the military, a static fort no longer served much purpose, for the enemy could go right around it. Thus, Fort Sumter and Battery Huger were decommissioned after the war, and in 1948 the property was given to the National Park Service.

The Fort Sumter Museum and a book / souvenir store are located inside the battery.

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Last updated on March 23, 2020
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