Monocacy National Battlefield | GAMBRILL MILL

Edgewood Mansion at the Gambrill Mill stop on the Monocacy National Battlefield Tour

Edgewood Mansion at the Gambrill Mill stop on the Monocacy National Battlefield Tour

MONOCACY NATIONAL BATTLEFIELD TOUR

STOP 4:  GAMBRILL MILL

Allow 20 minutes for a visit
Add an extra 30 minutes if you walk the Gambrill Mill Trail

The fourth stop on the Monocacy National Battlefield Tour is at Gambrill Mill. Union troops were stationed here to keep the Confederates from crossing the Monocacy River via the Georgetown Turnpike wooden covered bridge and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad bridge. While the Confederates originally intended to cross here, General Jubal Early soon realized that a frontal assault would be too costly and difficult, so he eventually shifted his focus to the southwest and had his men cross the river at Worthington Ford, allowing him to attack the Union on its far left flank at the Thomas Farm.

At the time of the Civil War, the property was owned by James Gambrill. He had purchased it in 1855, and with it came a grist mill (Araby Mills) that was built in 1830. The mill building was used as a short-lived Union hospital during the one-day Battle of Monocacy.

Gambrill Mill at Monocacy National Battlefield

Gambrill Mill at Monocacy National Battlefield

The large, Second Empire-style mansion that stands today, what Gambrill named Edgewood, was not built until 1872. It was one of the largest homes in Frederick County at the time. The Gambrills lived in the house until 1901. By that time his business had soured due to increased competition from much larger mills in the mid-west, and he was forced to sell the house and property to pay bills. The mill ceased operation at that time, though the mansion was continuously occupied by subsequent owners until being purchased by the National Park Service in 1981. Today it is the home of the National Park Service Historic Preservation Training Center and is not open to the public.

Edgewood Mansion at the Gambrill Mill stop on the Monocacy National Battlefield Tour

Edgewood Mansion at the Gambrill Mill stop on the Monocacy National Battlefield Tour

In the 1920s, the mill building itself was renovated into an apartment. The original building was three stories tall, and it had an undershot waterwheel, which is a wheel located inside the building at the bottom level, so even when in operation it did not have the appearance of a traditional flour mill. Today it is used as offices by the National Park Service.

Visitors to Gambrill Mill can walk the grounds of Edgewood and the mill. A short trail, the Gambrill Mill Trail, leads out to the Monocacy River. There is also a small pond and three picnic tables next to the mill.

Pond at Monocacy National Battlefield's Gambrill Mill

Pond at Monocacy National Battlefield’s Gambrill Mill

Picnic tables at Gambrill Mill, Monocacy National Battlefield

Picnic tables at Gambrill Mill, Monocacy National Battlefield

If you travel to Gambrill Mill from the previous stop on the tour, the Thomas Farm, you will pass two monuments located near the corner of Araby Church Road and Baker Valley Road. There is a church on the corner where you can park. The larger of the two is the granite Pennsylvania Monument dedicated to three Pennsylvania infantry regiments: the 67th, 87th, and 138th. The 87th and 138th were stationed on the Thomas Farm during the Battle of Monocacy. The men of the 67th did not actually fight in the battle because they did not arrive in time. I suppose the regiment is mentioned on the monument because, after all, it’s the thought that counts. The monument was the second placed on the battlefield, the first being the 14th New Jersey Monument (Stop 2 on the battlefield tour). It was dedicated on November 24, 1908.

Pennsylvania Monument at Monocacy National Battlefield

Pennsylvania Monument at Monocacy National Battlefield

Inscription on the Pennsylvania Monument at Monocacy National Battlefield

Inscription on the Pennsylvania Monument at Monocacy National Battlefield

The smaller monument is the Vermont Monument (located right on the corner of Baker Valley and Araby Church roads), which honors the 10th Vermont Infantry Regiment that fought at Monocacy. Seventy-five men of the regiment were stationed at Monocacy Junction while the rest were on the left flank of the Union line at the Thomas Farm. The monument was dedicated in 1915 and was the third state monument on the battlefield.

Vermont Monument at Monocacy National Battlefield

Vermont Monument at Monocacy National Battlefield

Inscription on the Vermont Monument at Monocacy National Battlefield

Inscription on the Vermont Monument at Monocacy National Battlefield



Stop 5: 14th New Jersey Monument | Stop 3: Thomas Farm | Battlefield Tour Home Page


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Last updated on May 5, 2023
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