Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area | JONES BRIDGE HISTORIC RUINS

The former Jones Bridge ruins

The former Jones Bridge ruins


Jones Bridge Unit Main Page


In January 2018, the ruins of the Jones Bridge collapsed. Since the structure was blocking the river, it has since been removed. There is absolutely nothing left of the bridge other than the sign that once warned people not to climb on it—and who knows when somebody will walk off with that. In most cases, if I find out that an attraction at a park no longer exists, I remove the article about it, but I have decided to leave this one up so that those doing research on the bridge ruins can see photos of what it looked like.

Only a sign remains at the former spot of the Jones Bridge ruins

Only a sign remains at the former spot of the Jones Bridge ruins

If you want to see where the bridge once stood, park at the north end parking lot at the Jones Bridge Unit and walk out to the hiking trail that runs along the Chattahoochee River. Take a left on the trail and hike for ten to fifteen minutes until you come to the second of two canoe launches and two large mansions. The bridge stood next to the canoe launch. (I bet the collapse scared the hell out of the people living in the mansions.)

The original Jones Bridge spanned the Chattahoochee River from 1904 until it was abandoned in 1922 due to a new bridge that made it obsolete. By the early 1930s it began to deteriorate. What remained was a metal frame without any road materials on it. Oddly enough, the bridge ended halfway across the river. Supposedly the missing portion was stolen in 1940. Workers began cutting down the bridge without authorization, probably to sell it for scrap. People in the surrounding neighborhoods figured that they were government authorized, so they never said anything about it.

From the river it is easy to see that only half of Jones Bridge remains

From the river it is easy to see that only half of Jones Bridge remains

Remains of the original Jones Bridge

Remains of the original Jones Bridge

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Last updated on November 21, 2018
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