Everglades National Park | GUY BRADLEY TRAIL

Guy Bradley Trail trailhead on the Flamingo Campground side

Guy Bradley Trail trailhead on the Flamingo Campground side


See the Hiking web page for an interactive location map.


Length: 1.2 mile, round trip
Time: 30 minutes on foot, 10 minutes on bike
Difficulty: Easy

The Guy Bradley Trail is an out-and-back trail that runs between the Flamingo Group Campground and the Flamingo Visitor Center at Everglades National Park. It is open to hikers and bikers, and being completely flat and paved the entire way, it is also accessible by those in wheelchairs. There isn’t much reason to hike it unless you are traveling between the two locations and prefer to get some exercise instead of driving.

The trailhead at the campground can be found by following the signs to the Amphitheater and driving all the way to the end of the road. You will pass the Walk-in and Group camping areas. The official trail starts at the forest, but to get there you must walk down a long path from the parking area, which is from where the stated mileage for this trail is measured.

Path from the campground parking lot

Path from the campground parking lot

If hiking from the Visitor Center, the trailhead is to the right of the buildings at the end of a long sidewalk.

View of the Flamingo Visitor Center from the Guy Bradley Trail

View of the Flamingo Visitor Center from the Guy Bradley Trail

The Guy Bradley Trail runs along the Florida Bay, but trees and other vegetation block the view for most of the way. On occasion there is an opening in the trees that allows you a view of the ocean. There are a few information panels along the way that discuss the plants and animals that live in the area.

Florida Bay

Florida Bay

In the late 1800s and early 1900s, the rage in women’s fashion was feathers for hats. Hunting birds in the Everglades was big business, and entire flocks could be killed off in a day. Guy Bradley was a former plume hunter who became a game warden once legislation was passed to protect the birds in 1902. He was murdered by poachers in 1905.

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Last updated on January 1, 2020
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